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The Shining Sequel: Watch Ewan McGregor Go Mad in Doctor Sleep Trailer

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Remember Danny Torrance? The little boy from Stanley Kubricks 1980 horror classic The Shining, based on the eponymous Stephen King novel, whose dad (Jack Nicholson) goes nuts during a stay at the Overlook Hotel? Well, hes ready to be haunted all over again in a newly released trailer for Doctor Sleep, a follow-up to Kings classic horror story. Ewan McGregor plays the grown-up version of Danny, 40 years after the events of The Shining.

In the new film, Danny encounters a teen girl named Abra (first-timer Kyliegh Curran), who seeks him out because of his special ability. “Youre magic, like me,” she says. Such optimism! It doesnt take long before Danny bursts her bubble, warning her about the evil that surrounds them. “I need you to listen to me,” he says. “The worlds a hungry place. A dark place. I only met two or three people like us. They died. When I was a kid, I bumped into these things. I dont know about magic. I always called it the Shining.” Abra, as it turns out, knows all about the darkness surrounding her. Shes being hunted by an evil woman named Rose the Hat (Rebecca Ferguson) and her followers, the True Knot, who feed off Abras powers—which is in part why the young girl sought out Dannys help.

As expected, the trailer uses quite a bit of footage from the original Shining, including snippets of young Danny (then played by Danny Lloyd) wheeling down the Overlook hallway past Room 237, and a snippet of the iconic bloody elevator scene. There are also major callbacks, including the phrase “red rum” scratched on walls and doors, and grown-up Danny peeking his head out of the door that his father once smashed open with an axe, briefly recreating the legendary “Heres Johnny” scene.

Written and directed by Mike Flanagan, and based on the 2013 King novel of the same name, Doctor Sleep will hit theaters on Nov. 8, 2019. Thats just a few months after the It: Chapter Two sequel hits theaters, proving Stephen Kings Hollywood renaissance will never, ever end.

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Get Vanity Fairs HWD NewsletterSign up for essential industry and award news from Hollywood.Full ScreenPhotos:Behold, 9 of the Best Screams in Horror-Movie History

Jamie Lee Curtis, Halloween (1978)

Ah, yes, Laurie Strode—the ultimate survivor. One of horrors most iconic “final girls,” Laurie spends a good portion of Halloween howling her head off, never more memorably than here.__Shelley Duvall, *The Shining* (1980)__

Shelley Duvall, The Shining (1980)

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Poor Wendy Torrance. She thought shed signed up for some relaxing time off the grid in an isolated, historic hotel—and instead, her husband wound up trying to murder her. On the bright side, at least she and their son, Danny, managed to escape—unlike Jack, who froze to death.__Fay Wray, *King Kong* (1933)__

Fay Wray, King Kong (1933)

One of the first scream queens, Fay Wrays bone-chilling shrieks in King Kong still stand the test of time.__Donald Sutherland, *Invasion of the Body Snatchers* (1978)__

Donald Sutherland, Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)

Its really the facial expression that makes this one so memorable.__Drew Barrymore, *Scream* (1996)__

Drew Barrymore, Scream (1996)

Yes, Neve Campbell does the bulk of the actual yelling in Scream—but it was Barrymores wail that set things off for the rest of the film. The genius of Screams slow opening is the pacing—the tension born out of all those minutes watching Barrymores character, Casey, stroll around the house as her eventual killer watches. When the scream finally comes, the film really takes off.__James Caan, *Misery* (1990)__

James Caan, Misery (1990)

Our feet hurt just thinking about the hobbling scene, and this scream is most of the reason why.__Susan Backlinie, *Jaws* (1975)__

Susan Backlinie, Jaws (1975)

If that screaming-while-drowning-and-being-eaten scene didnt keep you out of the water for at least a week, nothing will.PreviousNext

<strong>Jamie Lee Curtis, <em>Halloween</em> (1978)</strong>

Jamie Lee Curtis, Halloween (1978)

Ah, yes, Laurie Strode—the ultimate survivor. One of horrors most iconic “final girls,” Laurie spends a good portion of Halloween howling her head off, never more memorably than here.

<strong>Shelley Duvall, <em>The Shining</em> (1980)</strong>

Shelley Duvall, The Shining (1980)

Poor Wendy Torrance. She thought shed signed up for some relaxing time off the grid in an isolated, historic hotel—and instead, her husband wound up trying to murder her. On the bright side, at least she and their son, Danny, managed to escape—unlike Jack, who froze to death.

<strong>Fay Wray, <em>King Kong</em> (1933)</strong>

Fay Wray, King Kong (1933)

One of the first scream queens, Fay Wrays bone-chilling sRead More – Source


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